Category Archives: Culture

DevOps is for life, not just for techies

DevOps is a philosophy; it’s a way of life that you can use to transform your business methodology, improve your customer communications and revolutionise your results.

We’ve collated some fundamental DevOps principles that you can apply to all your business practises to streamline processes, revolutionise thinking and improve internal and external communications: Keep CALMS and use DevOps.

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Culture - Let yourself Fail

“The one who falls and gets up is stronger than the one who never fell.” It may be a cliché, but we really do learn from our mistakes. Don’t be afraid to try things, but learn to fail safely and make sure you learn from things that don’t work out.

Constant testing, re-evaluation and development is the only way to keep up with the modern world and this can be applied to software development, marketing strategies, personal goals – anything!

Automation – Focus on your business

Modern technology allows you to automate loads of areas of your life to free up your time – without it, juggling work, family, friends and the other components of contemporary culture would be impossible.

Automating systems and processes at work not only eliminates the risk of human error, but it frees up time to focus on the running of your business. Without having to spend man-power on monitoring, testing and updating your software you can focus more time into making your business the best it can be. Automation also means that your release processes are consistent, reliable and specific to your needs.

Lean – Cut down on waste

Originally devised and initiated by Toyota ‘Lean’ is a way of working that improves flow and eliminates waste: making obvious what adds value by reducing everything else. Implementing a Lean system in your processes means discarding superfluous, ‘wasteful’ activity and focusing on efficiently achieving your end result. These processes also reduce costs and production time as well as improving productivity.

This is ideal for efficiency in and out of the work environment – whether your new year’s resolution is to be more productive in your spare time, to recycle more or to get fit, try applying Lean principles to your day-to-day goals!

Metrics – Audience analysis

Who are your customers? How well are you able to monitor the way in which they engage/interact with your business/service? It’s important to keep up with the technological demands of an ever-tech savvy client base, but without listening to what they want, how can you know how to meet their need?

Implementing effective audience analysis technologies and responding quickly to their queries will establish you as trustworthy and responsive and will encourage repeat business.

Sharing – Sharing data

Do different departments within your business share work and information freely? Breakdowns of internal communication can result in the duplication of work and ineffective data management: one department may already have the data that another department is spending time collecting.

An integrated staff which shares information and works cohesively can understand each other’s individual roles, challenges and goals and will work more effectively to make your business the best it can be.

 

To learn more about how DevOpsGuys can help you make the changes you need visit our website or get in touch. Our Blog also has loads of fun, helpful articles to help you get an idea of how we work and what we can offer you.

The DevOps Revolution

“We transformed from a team of employees to a team of owners”– Jim Stoneham, Opsmatic

In a fascinating interview with Opsmatic’s Jim Stoneham Gene Kim revisits Flickr’s innovative 2009 ’10 deploys per day’ presentation.

Comparing different approaches to tackling the rapidly evolving platforms within Yahoo! Stoneham highlights the benefits of integrated working across departments, taking risks in order to learn and involving everyone, at every level with every element of the deployment process.

Working quickly, deploying frequently and developing on the fly means that teams learn faster from mistakes and are able to remain ahead of competitors, as well as responding intuitively to the needs of their audience. Teams are also more involved in the process – collaborating across departments means that everyone learns more and the product belongs to the team as a whole,  because they are all involved in every element of its creation, deployment and improvement.

Sharing knowledge and experience across teams means huge pools of resources at your fingertips. You can monitor your audience and give them what they are asking for as they need it. Working slowly to avoid risks will just lead to missed opportunities and an overall slower development. Frequent deploys and rapid responses to audience needs are vital:

When you move at that speed, and are looking at the numbers and the results daily, your investment level radically changes. This just can’t happen in teams that release quarterly, and it’s difficult even with monthly cycles.” - Jim Stoneham

Check out the full interview; a  genuinely interesting insight into the start of the DevOps revolution.

Leading experts bare all about the DevOps movement

The DevOps movement is rising, and an increasing number of IT professionals are keen to adopt this new way of working in order to achieve optimum collaboration between their Development and Operations departments. The ability to react quickly to customer demands is of top priority to businesses all over the world, and the benefits of DevOps is rapidly becoming widely known as offering fantastic business value.

Rackspace has released an Ebook and infographic, highlighting The DevOps Mindset: Real-World Insights from Tech Leaders to help you realise and implement your own DevOps practices within your organisation.

The Ebook shares valuable insights from practicing DevOps leaders with a key focus on outlining the need for enhanced collaboration, measurement and sharing through all aspects of any business. The DevOps Mindset showcases unique perspectives, challenges and achievements, as well as the catalysts which led them to adopt a DevOps mindset.

By successfully balancing the technical and social side of your development and operational processes you can actively learn and advance much quicker to help achieve your company goals. An unequal development of both sides will result in automation without collaboration and a lack of thought into exactly how your ideas and services will effectively be available to your customers.

DevOps advocate Jim Kimball, Chief Technology Officer at HedgeServ says: “I think the fundamental shift toward DevOps started when we got away from focusing on individual team goals and elevated our conversation to organizational goals and let the teams drive toward them.”

“To achieve true DevOps collaboration, you need your employees to really think and act as one, not just be merged together in name only. By pushing communication from the start, everyone gets a better feel for others’ needs and how they do their jobs.” Said James Kenigsberg, Chief Technology Officer at 2U, Inc.

This awesome Ebook shapes a Q&A format and delves deeper into how this new form of agile collaboration is sweeping its way through the software and IT industries.

You will also be able to take away useful tips for business leaders considering transforming their company culture towards a DevOps methodology.

We think this Ebook from Rackspace is a grade A piece, and an asset to anyone contemplating DevOps or thinking about adopting this innovative way of reaching new levels of productivity.

B.F Skinner on #DevOps (circa 1985)

I came across this interview with one of the founding father’s of behavioural psychology, B. F Skinner, the other day and was immediately struck by the phrase below:

What’s needed is to give satisfaction back to people. It’s the difference, he said, between a craftsman who makes a complete chair and a person on an assembly line who makes only the legs. The craftsman’s work, Skinner said, is constantly reinforced by the process of seeing the chair take form, and finally of producing the finished chair. But the assembly-line worker sees only chair leg after chair leg — never the completed product.

Skinner is not advocating elimination of important modern advances, such as the assembly line. But he would like to see industrial engineers and psychologists continue to team up and produce better workplaces and better ways of working that will offer modern employees the psychological lift that the craftsman once felt.” B.F. Skinner interview

To me, this neatly encapsulates one of the central tenets of the DevOps movement – we want to “team up and produce better workplaces and better ways of working” that deliver simultaneously better value (faster) for our organisations AND  improve the morale and job satisfaction of Developers & Operations staff. 

We need to CARE about the “completed product” because we’re following the “First Way” of Devops and using systems thinking models to look beyond our silos and relentlessly focus on the big picture. 

 

Is the S (Sharing) in CALMS Redundant?

@MLCarey321 asked a interesting question on Twitter the other day – is the S for Sharing in the CALMS model not redundant? If you have the right culture that emphasises collaboration & “no silos” surely “sharing” flows out of that? 

TwitterQuote

My view is that from a cultural perspective he’s probably right, a DevOps Culture definitely should encompass “sharing” as a core value so why do we need the extra S? 

CALMS Model of DevOps

I think that the extra S is there to emphasise that just having “sharing” as a core value isn’t enough – you need to actively put in place mechanisms to promote, facilitate and reward sharing at multiple levels

For example here at DevOpsGuys we:

  1. Heavily use Atlassian Confluence as a wiki for documentation and documentation is seen as a “living thing” that must be kept up to date because it has value to the team every day.
  2. Use HipChat for informal communication, “What am I doing now”, “Does anyone know something about topic xyz” etc. HipChat is also integrated with JIRA, PagerDuty, CI/CD. 
  3. JIRA Kanban boards for sharing “this is what the team / individual is working on how”, plus time-tracking and work status. 
  4. All of the 3 above are also accessible by the clients – so sharing means “sharing with the customer” too, not creating an “us&them” silo. 
  5. Blogging and presenting to share with the community is strongly encouraged and we’ve started a meetup group DevOps Cardiff (in addition to London Web Performance that I’ve run for 3 years)
  6. Our GitHub repo is a bit sparse at the moment but we hope to open-source some stuff in the future, particularly some samples around Powershell DSC

As we grow and we bring on more grads & apprentices everyone will be paired with a senior mentor to ensure that skills & experience are shared across team, and we’ll start doing weekly “brown-bag” session to further share knowledge.

One area we haven’t looked at yet is explicitly promoting sharing via an incentive/bonus scheme based on “# blog posts” or “# open source commits” or “StackOverflow Reputation“, mostly because I’ve never seen it work successfully in previous organisations in which I’ve worked.

That’s not to say it can’t work… but you have to think about it very carefully or otherwise you risk incentivising the wrong behaviour. My feeling at the moment is that this will remain “ad-hoc” when someone shares “something cool” or gets accepted to speak at a conference or something.

How do you promote, facilitate and reward sharing in your organisations? 

#DevOps – Organic versus Transformational DevOps

Despite what some people seem to think there is more to DevOps than just Continuous Delivery and Infrastructure Automation with Puppet, Chef or Ansible.

To me, DevOps is “an alternative model for the creation of business value from the software development life-cycle that encompasses a product-centric view across the entire product life-cycle (from inception to retirement) and recognises the value in close collaboration, experimentation and rapid feedback”.

Moving from one model of value creation can either be an organic process or a transformational one – you can “grow into” the new model or you can plan a strategy of change to transform your organisation from one to the other.

It’s in this “Organic DevOps” versus “Transformational DevOps” that I see a growing disconnect between different sectors of the DevOps community, particularly between “DevOps for Start-ups” and “DevOps for Enterprise”.

IMHO, “Start-Ups DevOps” normally follows the “organic DevOps” path – you’re often starting from a relatively “greenfields” approach based on a cloud infrastructure. You probably already have a very close, collaborative culture because there’s only 20 of you anyway and you all work in the same office and you spend 18hrs a day there. Automation is part of your DNA because you’ve never had the staffing levels to do it manually.

“Enterprise DevOps” is normally “Transformational DevOps” – you have large, distributed IT teams that cross geographic locations, time-zones and probably organisational boundaries (due to outsourcing). You have extensive legacy applications and infrastructure estates (JVM 1.4 on Tomcat 5 anyone?) and you’re likely to have well developed Prince2/ITIL/SixSigma delivery models rigidly enforced by a centralised command&control mindset, backed by an army of highly-paid consultant from the Big 5 telling your CEO, CIO and CTO the best way to manage their IT budget.

Moving an enterprise to DevOps via a transformation programme is a very different challenge to introducing DevOps concepts into a receptive start-up and watching them grow organically, and the DevOps community needs to make sure that when it’s evangelising DevOps to the world that it’s aware of the differences and challenges inherent in each approach.

If you want to debate this idea of “Start-up Organic versus Enterprise Transformational DevOps” we’re taking part in a Webinar tonight with the great folks over at ScriptRock that’s focussing on Enterprise DevOps. It’s at 1900 BST,  11:00am PT / 2:00pm ET (60 minutes).

We’d really like to get your thoughts on this by asking a question on the webinar or by leaving a comment below as these concepts are still experimental and, just like DevOps itself, the faster we get feedback and the more we iterate around the concept the stronger it will be!

http://info.scriptrock.com/devops_webinar-2

Enterprise DevOps Webinar
Enterprise DevOps Webinar

 

 

A scientific basis for #DevOps success?

A fascinating TED talk from “Predictably Irrational” author Dan Ariely has some interesting pointers to some of the underlying psychological mechanisms that make the DevOps model a better way to structure work within IT departments.

“we care much more about a product if we’ve participated from start to finish rather than producing a single part over and over.”

The accompanying article lists 7 insights into our motivations when performing tasks (and the research that supports those insights).

  1. Seeing the fruits of our labour may make us more productive
  2. The less appreciated we feel our work is, the more money we want to do it
  3. The harder a project is, the prouder we feel of it
  4. Knowing that our work helps others may increase our unconscious motivation
  5. The promise of helping others makes us more likely to follow rules
  6. Positive reinforcement about our abilities may increase performance
  7. Images that trigger positive emotions may actually help us focus

Many of these tie directly back to key DevOps principles.

For example the “First Way of DevOps” encourages “systems thinking” which relates directly to #1 above – if we are looking at the entire system (not just our small part) we will inherently be looking at the “fruits of our labour”.

Similarly fostering a team-based DevOps culture where we can see “how our work impacts on others” is closely aligned with #4.

For me, #2 and #6 tie directly back to “leadership” (as opposed to “management”). Good leaders know that praise (either private 1:1 praise with individuals or public praise in front of the team) can have a huge impact on morale, with a subsequent impact on productivity and quality.

It’s fascinating to see how behavioural science is increasing our understanding of human motivation. The challenge for us in the DevOps movement is to take these science-based insights and see how we can apply them with our teams to create a better way of working.